Contemporary Notation Project: Michael Baldwin

It gives me great pleasure to welcome Michael Baldwin as the Rambler’s first ever guest poster. Michael is an American artist currently living in Huddersfield, who works around the medium of sound, specifically in contemporary concert-hall music performance contexts. In his words, he is ‘primarily invested in examining the margins of musical performance practice through foregrounding non-sonic aspects of performance, with an emphasis on physical mannerisms/movement and conditions of body-instrument transaction.’ I’m always interested in margins, as well as matters of musical performance and transmedial coding of information, so I was very happy when Michael offered to write a post for the Contemporary Notation Project explaining his use of video as a notational practice.

If you are a composer with an interesting or unusual notational practice, and you would like to contribute a short post on your work, please get in touch.

As a contribution to this series I offer a recent trio of mine, this is not natural,for double bass, piano and horn. In line with my interest in ‘physical mannerisms/movements and conditions of body-instrument transaction’, a live performance of this is not natural lays bare a rate-of-movement relationship between musicians’ bodies and their musical instruments.

this is not natural – performers: Corey Klein [Horn]; Pieter Lenaerts [double bass]; Tomoko Honda [piano]

The observer of this is not natural is presented with the original raw material of the piece in the first 15 seconds – material that for the remainder of the piece is subjected to temporal, technological and compositional applications of transformation. From these first 15 seconds, the parameter of performance I am most interested in is movement – in particular, musical-instrument influenced physical movement.[1] This parameter, its transformation and, in turn, the remainder of the piece, brings me to the heart of my contribution here.

this is not natural works with video-graphic notation where the production process is important and sequential.

Production process:

  • Initial collaboration with musicians
    • Determination of what physical and sonic elements are deployable at different rates of movement
  • Original 15-second choreography taught to trio
  • A variant version of original choreography taught to trio and video-recorded
    • Only two differences between original choreography and variant version:
      • Performers instructed to direct their line of vision away from each other towards a personal laptop screen
      • Performers physically provoked by a sonic stimulus resulting in disengagement of line-of-vision focus and an attendant facial expression resembling shock
  • Variant version video-recorded from different perspectives and edited to show most important angle for a performer at a given time.
  • Three videos made, with one for each performer
  • Each edited video-recording treated as an object subject to technological alteration through time-stretching
    • Videos stretched from 15 seconds to 9 minutes resulting in dramatically slower rates of physical movement[2]

Variant version of original choreography

Individual video-score (piano)

Here are the scores for horn and double bass. Blue shading in the horn part is indicative of action taking place in or around the mouth.

In performance, the musicians enact the original 15 seconds of raw material from memory and subsequently turn their gaze towards their laptop screen where they continue by performing from their video-score for the remainder of the piece. What the observer is presented with then is in many ways an ambiguous repetition. The repetition is ambiguous in that it at times appears to be a direct repetition of the source material, and at other times either seems to be, or is, a clear departure from the first 15 seconds of material. My own experience of the piece, on a structural level, is one of constantly flickering back and forth in my mind between two modalities of performance-observation (looking and listening) relative to the original presentation of performance and the transformed version of performance, scanning for similarities and differences as they fit within the expectations setup by the initial 15-second framing of material.

Video-scores here are a mixture of descriptive and prescriptive notation that temporally (without recourse to presentation of past or future actions) delineate how a performer moves through space. Performers are confronted with slow-motion video of themselves, which they are instructed to mirror as accurately as possible, effectively embodying technologically distorted versions of themselves.[3] Importantly, this embodiment is only possible through a constant mediation between the performers’ kinesthetic knowledge of how these slow-motion movements feel in real-time (or learned-time). Performers are not simply miming their temporally stretched selves located in the video-scores. Instead, they are always reading – always in dialogue with how they know to move, how they are being shown to move, and how they remember moving.[4]

In my estimation, the presentation of the video-score (and the attendant presence of laptops to display the scores) draws considerable attention in the performers’ minds to body-instrument movement, and attention from the audience towards how musicians move and how they are directed to move – in this case through what can, at times, seem an eerie (or at least distance-inducing) technological means. By shifting the focus towards the arenas of musical movement and human-score interfaces, a resultant affect of ‘making the familiar strange’ (a well-trod artistic device) is manifest. This affect has marked repercussions on not only the atmosphere of the concert-hall, but also casts performative shadows on the pieces before and after.[5] As I perceive it, the piece invites the observer to reassess both retroactively and prospectively the conditions of performance. In other words, the piece and its affect(s) palpably extend well beyond the frame of the piece and begin to seep into an audience’s perception of the surrounding performance context.

this is not natural marks my first exploration into using video-scores as a notational medium, and will likely be a mode of performance-information dissemination in future pieces. Other pieces of mine have used alternative scores/notations such as audio-scores, picture-scores and mimetic/human-scores. For readers interested in these pieces, more information can be found throughout my website.

Notes

[1] Bodily movements informed by transactions and mediations between musicians and their instrument(s) of performance.

[2] One will notice that the degree of temporal stretch is not constant throughout. There are portions that have been warped faster or slower (with the end coming to a complete stand-still). These alterations of temporal stretching are a result of both practical (physically possible) and aesthetic/compositional considerations.

[3] On this point I suggest watching both Renée Lear’s Renée Taking a Sip of Water (Human and Video in Motion) and, with a less transhumanist tone, Bill Viola’s Quintet of the Astonished.

[4] Although the notation is focused primarily on movement, it is worth noting there are parameters of movement that are not fully accounted for in the video-scores presented here, the most significant of which is amount of force to be applied across the space of movement. In this regard, my video-scores are an incomplete medium towards instructing performance, cannot be engaged on its own (without, I’d argue, faulty extrapolation), and is dependent on the embodied kinesthetic knowledge described above.

[5] Here I am thinking of Michael Chekhov’s notions of atmospheres. Chekhov describes groups of people and the places people occupy (spaces) as having objective atmospheres and that no two distinct atmospheres can co-exist long before one either takes over as dominant or the disparate atmospheres synthesize into one. I would identify three basic elements within a concert-hall setting: the hall itself, the audience (with their cultural and experiential background), and the event/performance staged. What I’d like to propose here is that the atmosphere exuded by this is not natural has the effect of silencing the audience’s and concert-hall’s emanating atmospheric energies, drawing an observer further into the piece’s inner logic and bringing under careful consideration both the spectacle of the event and the sonic byproducts of said spectacle. See Michael Chekhov, To the Actor (Routledge, 2002): 47-62.

Secret Music: July

(Click for the background to the Secret Music listings.)

Friday 4 July: Silk Street Music Hall, GSMD | Plus Minus | 7.00pm | FREE

Plus-Minus ensemble present five new works by postgraduate Guildhall composers, and a rare opportunity to hear Peter Ablinger’s experimental Amtssee bei Regen.

Friday 4 July: St Mary at Hill | 7.30pm | £8 advance/£10 on the door

The 10th season of Music We’d Like to Hear gets underway, with new support from Sound and Music (as co-producers) and as always a lush programme of three concerts on three Fridays curated by three composers. First up is Tim Parkinson’s concert, Drums and Piano: pieces by Matteo Fargion, Jonathan Marmor (whose Cattle in the Woods was a memorable feature of last year’s programme), Makiko Nishikaze, Chiyoko Szlavnics, Kunsu Shim and Christian Wolff, played by Adam Morris (percussion) and Parkinson (piano).

Friday 4 July: Parabola Arts Centre, Cheltenham | Smith Quartet and Joby Burgess | 7.30pm | £18

Music for string quartet (with or without percussion) at the Cheltenham Music Festival: Steve Reich, Different Trains; new piece by Graham Fitkin; Steve Martland, Starry Night.

Saturday 5 July: York Unitarian Chapel | Steve Martland tribute | 7.30pm | £10/£8 concs

More Martland: York’s Late Music Ensemble (specially formed for the occasion) will perform a tribute concert to the late composer, who died last May featuring performances of his ReveilleRemembering Lennon and Kick, as well as pieces by Louis Andriessen, Jeremy Dale Roberts, Roger Marsh and James Whittle.

Sunday 6 July: Parabola Arts Centre, Cheltenham | Tokaido Road | 4.30pm | £20

Cheltenham again, for the premiere of Nicola LeFanu’s new multi-media chamber opera Tokaido Road, set in 19th-century Japan and following the story of the artist Hiroshige. Created and commissioned by Okeanos, with a libretto by Nancy Gaffield.

Friday 11 July: St Mary at Hill | 7.30pm | £8 advance/£10 on the door

Second instalment of Music We’d Like to Hear, curated by Markus Trunk. Pieces for string quartet by Joanna Bailie, Carola Bauckholt, Matteo Fargion, Jo Kondo and Luiz Henrique Yudo (another highlight from last year). All played by the Ligeti Quartet.

Sunday 13 July: Cafe Oto | Laurence Crane CD launch | 8pm | £8 advance/£10 on the door

Apartment House give the UK premiere of Harley Gaber’s legendary The Winds Rise in the North (1973–4) for amplified string quintet, described by Keith Fullerton Whitman as ‘one of the holy grails of early minimalism’.

Tuesday 15 July: Cafe Oto | Laurence Crane CD launch | 8pm | £8 advance/£10 on the door

Launch concert for Apartment House’s long anticipated double CD of Laurence Crane’s chamber music (another timbre). Concert to include several pieces from the CD, performed by Apartment House.

Review of this (very special) CD to follow soon.

Friday 18 July: St Mary at Hill | 7.30pm | £8 advance/£10 on the door

Third instalment of Music We’d Like to Hear, curated by John Lely. Music for viols and objects by Antoine Beuger, William Lawes, Alvin Lucier, Taylan Susam and Christian Wolff. Played by Phantasm and the MWLTH ensemble.

Friday 25 July: Schotts recital room, 48 Great Marlborough Street | Dave Smith | 6.30pm | £10/£8 concs

A pre-65th birthday concert of works by Dave Smith performed by the composer. Programme to include Ogive 1African MosaicGuarachaFrivolous and Vexatious and 8 pieces from the 1st Piano Concert.

Secret Music: June

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Bit London-based again this one: if you have a concert elsewhere in the UK that you think I should consider listing, please get in touch.

Tuesday 3 June: Cafe Oto | Kammer Klang | 8pm | £7

Neil Luck and Adam de la Cour will be performing their duo-version of Kurt Schwitters’ classic Ursonate. Expect two men, ACME duck calls and 6ft of plastic tubing. Zubin Kanga will be performing Z/K, written for him by Michael Finnissy, and there will also be Berio, Xenakis, James Saunders and some live black MIDI. Like the blurb says, schwittloads of notes.

Wednesday 4 June: The Forge, Camden | Fidelio Trio and Ensemble Matisse | 7.30pm | £12.50/£10

The Fidelio Trio and Ensemble Matisse come together in a concert of works by British and European composers. Full programme:

  • Harrison Birtwistle: Piano Trio
  • David Fennessy: Music for the Pauses in a Conversation between John Cage and Morton Feldman
  • Claudia Molitor: after the strangely monumental
  • Johannes Maria Staud: Für Bálint András Varga
  • Philippe Hersant: Nachtgesang
  • Karol Beffa: La tristesse du roi (new arrangement; WP)
  • Guillaume Connesson: Adams Variations
  • Pascal Dusapin: invece

Tuesday 10 June: The Forge, Camden | New Dots | 7.30pm | £12.50/£10 on the door (£11/£9 online)

New Dots give  a programme of new music for piano and percussion by up and coming composers. Full programme:

Performed by Siwan Rhys (piano) and George Barton (percussion)

Tuesday 10 June: Hundred Years Gallery | clapTON ensemble | 7.30pm | £5

East London’s clapTON ensemble play works by Rebecca Saunders, Pierluigi Billone, Tristan Perich, Luciano Azzigotti, Santiago Díez Fischer and Anna Romashkova at the Hundred Years Gallery in Hoxton.

Thursday 12 June: City University | Mark Knoop/Gwenaëlle Rouger | 7pm | FREE

Knoop and Rouger piano duo, with added electronics from Newton Armstrong. Full programme:

  • Georg Friedrich Haas – Ein Schattenspiel
  • Ben Smith – the ineluctable modality of the audible (Water Music) (WP)
  • Georges Aperghis – Dans le mur
  • Georgia Rodgers – cut it out (WP)
  • Michael Beil – Doppel

Free to attend, but please book a place.

Sunday 15 June [NB: Date corrected]: Whitechapel Gallery | Voice and the Lens | 12pm | £12.50/£10

This brilliant festival of the human voice returns after its first incarnation at IKON gallery in 2012. Highlights include: Bill Viola’s Anthem; Bruce McLean and Adam de la Cour’s Drumstick; Anri Sala’s Answer Me; Robert Ashley’s classic Atalanta Strategy; recent work by Imogen Stidworthy, Helen Petts, Laure Prouvost, Neil Luck and Lina Lapelyte; Mikhail Karikis and specially-made new work by AMAE and Pier Giorgio De Pinto with philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy.

Monday 16 June: Deptford Town Hall | Ian Pace | 7.30pm | FREE

Ian Pace performs Goldsmiths student compositions alongside British premieres of music by Walter Zimmerman, Rebecca Saunders and Alistair Zaldua, the European premiere of some very old Ferneyhough, and more. Full programme:

  • Brian Ferneyhough: Invention (1965) (European Premiere)
  • Brian Ferneyhough: Lemma-Icon-Epigram (1981)
  • Nigel McBride: Juncture 1 (2012)
  • Alistair Zaldua: Spagyrea (2013-14)
  • Rebecca Saunders: shadow (2013)
  • Lauren Redhead: i am but one small instrument (2012)
  • Robin Haigh: Can You Hear Him Singing? (2014)
  • Natasha Prendergast: The Atonal Verses (2013)
  • Walter Zimmermann: Voces Abandonadas (Antonio Porchia), primera serie (2005)
  • Adam de la Cour: Holy Toledo (2013–14)

Tuesday 17 June: Royal Academy of Music | Zubin Kanga | 6pm | FREE

Pianist Zubin Kanga plays works written for him in collaboration with the their composers by Elo Masing, Michael Finnissy, David Gorton, David Young, Patrick Nunn and George Benjamin. Full programme:

  • Elo Masing: Studies in Resonance II
  • Michael Finnissy: Z/K
  • David Gorton: Orfordness
  • David Young: Not Music Yet
  • Patrick Nunn: Morphosis
  • George Benjamin: Piano Figures

Wednesday 25 June: Harwich Festival | Ein Brise | 6.30pm | FREE

Kagel’s famous piece for 111 cyclists receives its first outing in Scotland an outing as part of the Harwich Festival of the Arts (25 June–6 July). Free to watch; it starts on Harwich Green.

Secret Music: May

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Big month this one. A lot going on at the University of Leeds in the first half of the month, including their annual contemporary music weekend, from the 9th to the 11th. On the same weekend: Glasgow’s Tectonics Festival. Plus loads elsewhere too. Now updated with details of Sounds New.

Friday 2 May – Friday 9 May: Sounds New Contemporary Music Festival, Canterbury | various venues, times & prices

Argh, how did I miss including Sounds New the first time I posted? Canterbury’s new music festival is always interesting, and this year is no exception. The full week’s programme can be viewed here, but among the highlights that caught by eye are a new piece by Janek Schaefer; a concert by the London Sinfonietta of music by Cardew, Rzewski and Andriessen, and Johannes Kreidler’s Fremdarbeit (the first of at least two outings for this piece in the UK this summer); Sam Bailey doing a Ross Bolleter on a woodland piano; Lauren Redhead playing music for organ and electronics; and a Migro Records portrait.

Friday 2 May: Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, University of Leeds | LSTwo | 6pm | FREE

Leeds School of Music’s new music ensemble, directed by Mic Spencer, performs Birtwistle’s Tragoedia, a rare performance of James Dillon’s Zone (…de azul), and Emmanuel Nunes’ tour-de-force Improvisation I.

Saturday 3 May: Hundred Years Gallery, Hoxton | Weisslich | 7.00pm | FREE/£5 donation

Concert put together by Louis D’Heudieres of predominantly London and Huddersfield based composers, plus some Fluxus classics. Full programme:

Jammie Nicholas: Spandex and gobstoppers
Michael Baldwin: whistles whittling
Alison Knowles: shoes of your choice
David Pocknee: Pieces From @textscoreaday and Fluxus
Charlie Sdraulig between
Peter Ablinger/Louis d’Heudieres: variations on “panpiece” from WEISS/WEISSLICH 7
Louis d’Heudieres: Reconstruction #2 (some of the sounds may be replicable)
Andy Ingamells: How To Explain Songs To A Jellied Eel
George Brecht: Comb Music

Monday 5 May: Café Oto | Bryn Harrison’s Vessels | £6 adv/£8 on the door | 8pm

First London performance of the extended version of Bryn Harrison’s Vessels, recently released by another timbre. (A release that will be reviewed here soon.)

Thursday 8 – Friday 16 May: Dark Inventions: Firewheel | UK tour, various venues, times & prices

New music group Dark Inventions will be touring their show of music by Stef Connor, Benjamin Gait, Patrick John Jones, Christopher Leedham, Martin Scheuregger and Philip Cashian to Manchester, York, Leeds, Newcastle and Liverpool. See website for full details.

Friday 9 – Sunday 11 May: Tectonics Glasgow | various venues, times & prices

The BBC Scottish SO’s Tectonics Festival returns after its acclaimed first year. See the festival website for full details, but highlights include world premieres by John Oswald, Georg Friedrich Haas, James Weeks, Michael Finnissy, Klaus Lang and Sarah Kenchington, plus performances by EXAUDI, Christian Wolff and Thurston Moore.

Friday 9 May: Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, University of Leeds | Heather Roche | 1.05pm | FREE

Clarinetist Heather Roche plays solo works by Martin Iddon, Pedro Alvarez, Charlie Sdraulig and Michael Baldwin.

Friday 9 May: Norfolk Music Room, Victoria and Albert Museum | Mainly Two | 6.30pm | FREE

Violin duo Mainly Two (John Garner and Marie Schreer) play pieces (many of them new) by Charlie Sdraulig, Giovanni Cacioppo, Lauri Supponen, Tomi Räisänen, Cameron Graham, Noam Faingold, Jed Backhouse and Michael Oliva.

Saturday 10 May: Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, University of Leeds | Distractfold | 7.30pm | £8 (students + children FREE)

Distractfold presents a programme featuring a world premiere by Ben Isaacs (Distractfold Commission), the UK premiere of Spanish composer Abel Paul’s Linea de Vacío (Gaudeamus Musikweek 2010 selection), Martin Iddon’s Danaë for string trio, Distractfold co-director Sam Salem’s Dérive (Concours Luc Ferrari 2012 commission) and Canadian composer David Berezan’s acousmatic work, Thumbs.

Sunday 11 May: Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, University of Leeds | Percussion ensembles of the Musikhochschule Freiburg and the University of Leeds | 3pm | £8 (students + children FREE)

The percussion ensembles of the Musikhochschule Freiburg (Germany) and the University of Leeds present a works inspired by diverse natural elements, culminating in Iannis Xenakis’ seminal percussion sextet, Pleiades.

Sunday 11 May: Brasenose College, Oxford, Riot Ensemble | 9pm | FREE

Concert of Bach, Crumb and Debussy that also includes the UK premiere of I Shall Contemplate by Grawemeyer award-winning composer Djuro Zivkovic.

Monday 12 May: Senate House, University of London | Christian Wolff | 5pm | FREE

Fresh from his appearances at Glasgow’s Tectonics, Christian Wolff gives a talk on his music, followed by a short concert of his pieces given by Apartment House.

Tuesday 20 May: The Forge, London | Riot Ensemble | 7.30pm | £12/£10

The Riot Ensemble marks the anniversary of Dutilleux’s death with a performance of his Les citations, plus new pieces by Jose Manuel Serrano, Jenna Lyle, Arne Gieshoff, Chris Roe, Amy Beth Kirsten and Drew Schnurr, Ken Hesketh’s transcription of Dutilleux’s piano piece Blackbird, and Arlene Sierra’s Petite Grue. Pre-concert talk at 6.30pm.

Wednesday 21 May: St. John’s College, Cambridge | Riot Ensemble | 7.30pm | £10/£5

Same programme as above.

Secret Music: April

(Click for the background to the Secret Music listings.)

Again, some horrible clashes here. Also, if anyone knows of anything happening in the second half of the month, feel free to add to the comments.

Until Saturday 5 April, and Monday 2 – Sunday 8 June: Frontiers Festival, Birmingham | venues, prices, times vary

Birmingham Conservatoire’s annual contemporary music festival this year celebrates the music of Downtown New York. This was originally planned to coincide with the presence of Robert Ashley to receive an honorary doctorate, an event that will sadly not now take place. Ashley’s music is well represented, however, including the complete world premiere of String Quartet Describing the Motion of Real Bodies on 2 April. Other highlights (of many – see the full calendar) include Apartment House playing Songs for Drella (30 March); Pauline Oliveros in conversation (31 March) and a Deep Listening meditation (2 April); early Philip Glass (1 April); Carl Stone (2 April); as well as music by David Lang, Michael Gordon, William Basinski, Elliot Sharp …

Thursday 3 April: Silk Street Music Hall | Guildhall New Music Ensemble | 6:00pm | FREE

James Weeks conducts the Guildhall New Music Ensemble in a programme that includes premieres of works by Edmund Finnis and Thomas Fournil, and music by Aldo Clementi and Salvatore Sciarrino.

“The Guildhall New Music Ensemble is dedicated to the performance of music from the last 30 years, with each project curated by a different member of staff or by a guest curator. For the launch of the ensemble’s regular performance series at the School, Associate Head of Composition James Weeks has curated a programme of local and global compositional activity that will form the foundation of the ensemble’s future concerts.”

Thursday 3 April: Cafe OTO | Dumitrescu and Avram | 8pm | £8 adv/£10 on the door

Iancu Dumitrescu brings his Hyperion Ensemble, and his unorthodox performance practice, back to Cafe OTO for more spectral excursions and seat-of-the-pants musical phenomenology.

Thursday 3 April: Studio Theatre, Library of Birmingham | Automatic Writing | 7pm | £12(£8)

Fresh from giving the UK premiere of Robert Ashley’s masterful Automatic Writing at Cafe Oto, Object Collection (Kara Feely, Travis Just, Aaron Meicht, Daniel Nelson, Tim Parkinson, Fulya Peker) bring the work to Birmingham’s Frontiers Festival. Concert also includes New York Girls by Kara Feely and Travis Just.
Sunday 6 April: Charlie Wright’s International Bar & Jazz Lounge, 45 Pitfield St, London | John White Birthday Concert | 4pm | FREE but pre-booking essential
Performances by Gavin Bryars, Dr. Margaret Coldiron, Carole Finer, Julian Haxby, Chris Hobbs, John Lely, Kaffe Matthews, Tim Parkinson, Michael Parsons, Andrea Rocca, Hugh Shrapnel, Dave Smith, John Tilbury, John White; and by various ensembles, namely: Bad Dog, LelyWhite, Live Batts; and by the official orchestra of the Institute: The London Snorkelling Team.

There will be participatory performances of The Drinking and Hooting Machine and the Newspaper-reading Machine – a more detailed programme will be emailed before the event.

Thai food available from the kitchens. Tickets are free (a hat will be passed around) and open to all, but they are also limited; people must be on the guest-list to attend, and specify if bringing a guest. To get on the list write to: editor@atlaspress.co.uk without delay.

Tuesday 8 April: St George’s RC Cathedral, Westminster Bridge Road | Ian Wilson’s Stations | 7:30pm | email enquiries@matthewschellhorn.com to join guest list

Matthew Schellhorn performs Ian Wilson’s monumental solo piano masterpiece, Stations. Inspired by the Catholic devotion of the Stations of the Cross, Stations is a fourteen-movement work divided into four ‘Books’. Matthew Schellhorn has premiered the work in stages over two years, giving a performance of its final part at Wigmore Hall in 2008. His recording of the piece will be released on Diatribe Records this month, and this concert is the first in a tour that also takes in Glasgow (10 April), Dublin (13 April), Blackheath Halls (14 April), Edinburgh (15 April), Cambridge (16 May), Thorpe Bay (18 May), Wymondham Abbey (29 June) and Ripon (10 July).

Tuesday 8 April: City University, Performance Space | James Saunders portrait | 7pm | FREE, booking essential

Programme: Everybody doing what everybody else is doing; With paper; So many territories (first performance); Things whole and not whole; Everybody do this

Performed by Plus-Minus.

Friday 11 April: Schott Recital Room, 48 Great Marlborough St, W1f 7BB | 7pm | £10

Tim Parkinson plays premieres of new works by Laurence Crane, Matteo Fargion, Joseph Kudirka and himself, plus recent pieces by Jürg Frey and Chiyoko Szlavnics.

Saturday 26 April: Cello Factory, Cornwall Road, London SE1 | 7pm | £8

Swiss percussion trio DeciBells are joined by flautist Jenni Hogan in a programme of Lou Harrison, Scelsi, Pierre Favre, Benjamin Graves, Gwyn Pritchard and Siegfried Kutterer.

Secret Music: March

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Better late than never, and with apologies to performers whose concerts this month I’ve already missed. A couple of horrible clashes in this month’s line-up :-(

Saturday 15 March: Jerwood Hall, LSO St Luke’s | Music in the Space Time Continuum II | 6.30pm | £12, students £5

Salzburg’s Ensemble OENM play the following programme:

Josquin (trans R. D. Rusconi): Le miroir de musique (An educational outreach performance)
Haas: Tria ex uno
R. D. Rusconi: Anankè
Grisey: Vortex temporum

Thursday 20 – Sunday 23 March: Britannia House, London E1 | LCMF presents The Music of Bernard Parmegiani | times/prices vary

Four events: a screening of short films and documentaries around Parmegiani’s work (Thursday); performances of two of his greatest works, Violostries (1964) and La Création du monde (1984) (Friday); works from the early 1970s (Saturday); and Dedans dehors (1977) and Espèces d’éspace (2002) (Sunday). There are other live sets and screenings woven in there too. Full details here.

Saturday 22 March – Saturday 5 April, and Monday 2 – Sunday 8 June: Frontiers Festival, Birmingham | venues, prices, times vary

Birmingham Conservatoire’s annual contemporary music festival this year celebrates the music of Downtown New York. This was originally planned to coincide with the presence of Robert Ashley to receive an honorary doctorate, an event that will sadly not now take place. Ashley’s music is well represented, however, including the complete world premiere of String Quartet Describing the Motion of Real Bodies on 2 April. Other highlights (of many – see the full calendar) include Apartment House playing Songs for Drella (30 March); Pauline Oliveros in conversation (31 March) and a Deep Listening meditation (2 April); early Philip Glass (1 April); Carl Stone (2 April); as well as music by David Lang, Michael Gordon, William Basinski, Elliot Sharp …

Thursday 27 – Sunday 30 March: The Warehouse, Waterloo, London | 2nd London Ear Festival of Contemporary Music | times/prices vary

More details on this to follow in a separate post, but in essence: nine concerts over four days, plus masterclasses, pre-concert talks and other fun. Composers featured include Rebecca Saunders, Helmuth Oehring, Simon Steen-Andersen and Georg Katzer. Performers include London Sinfonietta, We Spoke, Uroboros and Eva Zöllner. Full programme (pdf) here.

Friday 28 March: Schott Recital Room, 48 Great Marlborough St, W1f 7BB | 7pm | £10

Tim Parkinson plays premieres of new works by Laurence Crane, Matteo Fargion, Joseph Kudirka and himself, plus recent pieces by Jürg Frey and Chiyoko Szlavnics. Now taking place on 11 April

Saturday 29 March: St Giles’ Cripplegate, London | 7.30pm | £15, £7 (students), £1 (under 16)

EXAUDI  performs works by Chase, Cardew, Cage, Feldman, Skempton, Fox, and joins forces with Finchley Choral Society as the soloists in A. Scarlatti’s Dixit Dominus.

Sunday 30 March: Cafe OTO | 8pm | £8 adv. £10 on the door

In what will now presumably be something of a tribute concert, Object Collection (Kara Feely, Travis Just, Aaron Meicht, Daniel Nelson, Tim Parkinson, Fulya Peker) play Robert Ashley’s masterful Automatic Writing, plus New York Girls by Kara Feely and Travis Just.

Secret Music: February

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Saturday 1 February: Cafe OTO, Lauren Redhead, Gail Brande, ORE, 8pm | £8 adv, £10 door

Cumbria-based new music and sound art festival Full of Noises presents two nights of performances by artists from their 2013 programme. Day 2 sees performances from composer Lauren Redhead, who will be presenting a version of her piece Entoptic Landscapes, composed for FON alongside other short pieces; a solo trombone set from Gail Brand, who has been described as “the most exciting trombone player for years” by The Wire; and amplified tuba duo ORE, making music informed (but not limited) by their enthusiasm for drones, doom metal, improvisation and minimalism.

Sunday 2 February: Kings Place, Wespoke, 4pm | £9.50 online/£12.50 on the door

This concert brings together Laurent Estoppey (saxophone), Kerry Yong (keyboards), Serge Vuille (percussion) and Juliet Fraser (soprano) in an exploration of the cultural heritage of song.

The programme features premieres of Antoine Joly’s loving and critical medley, History of Swiss Song, and the fifth volume of Matthew Shlomowitz’s Popular Contexts, as well as Bernhard Lang’s DW16, Songbook, a work that explores difference and repetition in the form of five songs with lyrics by artists such as Bob Dylan and prog-rocker Peter Hammill.

Sunday 2 February: Islington Mill, Manchester, Psappha, 9pm | £8 (student £5)

Performance of Gavin Bryars’ The Sinking of the Titaniccombining live music, live drawing, photography and 3D film.

Wednesday 5 February: The Forge, Chroma + Riot Ensemble, The Flatulence of the Gods“, 7.30pm | £12 (£10 conc)

Kicking off a new series of contemporary music at the Forge (a regular venue in last year’s Secret Music listings), Chroma and the Riot Ensemble present works by Scott Lygate, Amy Beth Kirsten, Chris Mayo, Martijn Padding and Riot Ensemble’s director Aaron Holloway-Nahum.

Monday 10 February: Cafe OTO, 8pm | £5 adv, £6 door

Screening of Viola Rusche and Hauke Harder’s documentary on Alvin Lucier, No Ideas But In Things.

Tuesday 11 to Saturday 15 February: The Vaults, Leake St, London SE1 8SW, WOLF PACK at Vault Festival, 9pm | £10, or £16 for two nights

Two separate shows, TEXT (11 and 14 Feb) and BODY (12, 13 and 15).

TEXT will include The Waves, a rarely performed Frederic Rzewski piece alongside new works by composers Jess Harvey and Tom Green, and new interpretations of songs by Kate Bush and Goldfrapp. The concert will also present works by John White, Malcolm Atkins, Karlheinz Stockhausen and two pieces based on the work of John Cage, one of which is a brand new work devised by the ensemble.

BODY will feature a dance collaboration in the premier of Did You See Me Dance? by Dave Collins and Sam Goodway alongside music by Toru Takemitsu, Edmund Joliffe, Steve Reich and Manuela Kerer, and interpretations of songs by Frank Zappa and Stevie Wonder.

Programmed as part of the Vault Festival.

Thursday 13 February: Club inégales, 108 Gower Street, London, doors 7pm, music 8pm | £10 (£6 conc)

Peter Wiegold’s Club inégales begins its spring season with a concert of music by Howard Skempton.

Tuesday 18 February: City University, London, Richard Craig and Loré Lixenberg, 7pm | Free, but adv booking required

Flautist Richard Craig presents three premieres: two new solo works from his collaborations with Richard Barrett and Kristian Ireland and duo work (with with Loré Lixenberg) by John Croft for voice and bass flute.

Full programme:

Richard Barrett – Vale (world premiere)
John Croft – Deux Meditations d’une Furie (world premiere)
Brian Ferneyhough – Mnemosyne
Loré Lixenberg – Work tba
Kristian Ireland – Luminous (world premiere)

Friday 21 to Sunday 23 February: Bristol New Music, various venues, times, etc.

First event of a new consortium devoted to bringing the best new music to Bristol. The weekend-long festival combines modern classical, jazz and visual arts. Rambler-oriented highlights include Quatuor Bozzini on SaturdayEllen Fullman, also on Saturday (seriously, if you’re anywhere close, don’t miss this); Bristol Ensemble on Sunday; and musikFabrik, also on Sunday.

Friday 28 February: International Anthony Burgess Foundation, Manchester, Psappha, 6pm | £10 (student £8)

A new multimedia production of Anthony Burgess’s musical setting of The Waste Land, performed by Psappha and incorporating rarely seen treasures from the Burgess Estate. Narrated by Jonathan Best, with soprano Rebecca Lea, directed by Elaine Tyler-Hall.

Friday 28 February: Cafe OTO, Apartment House, Jérôme Noetinger, 8pm | £7 adv, £8 door

Swiss composer and sound artist Antoine Chessex returns to Cafe OTO with a new composition for Apartment House, augmented by French electroacoustic musician Jérôme Noetinger. The concert begins with a performance from the duo of Steve Noble (percussion) and Yoni Silver (bass clarinet).

Secret Music: November

(Click for the background to the Secret Music listings.)

Please note, by the way, that for the purposes of ‘secret music’, I’m not including HCMF, which takes place this month, or the Southbank’s The Rest is Noise festival, which is now definitively in my hitting zone of the 1970s and 80s. Both of these events are well publicised as it is and I doubt anyone reading this is unaware that they’re on. It’s less well-known events like those below that I’m keen to support here.

The big event this month in London has to be Nonclassical’s Pioneers of Percussion festival, taking place between 6 and 22 November. As well as live music there will be talks, film screenings and workshops. Details of each event follow; there look to be some seriously good events here:

Wednesday 6: The Macbeth: New York / London: What’s Happening Now, 8pm |£5

We open the festival with a night tracing the creative ties between these two great cities. With music by David Lang, Steve Martland, Judd Greenstein and others, and the premieres of our competition winners.

Saturday 9: Oval Space: Percussion and Orchestra, 7pm | £8/£10

Bartók’s masterpiece Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta broke new ground in the 1930s, placing the percussionist at the centre of the classical orchestra. Here it is heard in the contemporary surroundings of East London’s Oval Space, alongside Gabriel Prokofiev’s recent Concerto for Bass Drum, Kate Whitley’s Split for clarinet, percussion and strings, and a pivotal solo work by Iannis Xenakis, Psappha. Multi-Story Orchestra, conducted by Christopher Stark, featuring soloists Rozenn Le Trionnaire and Jude Carlton.

Sunday 10: St Margarets House: Reich in Ghana Drumming Workshop, 1pm | £5/£8

Found sound expert Saul Eisenberg and percussionist Serge Vuille lead a workshop in which participants will create their own unique ‘junk’ instruments to form an ensemble like no other. All participants are then invited to perform at the Festival’s big night at Scala.

Wednesday 13: Hackney Picturehouse: The Evolution of the Drum Kit, 7.30pm | £7

The award-winning Beware of Mr Baker (2012)  tells the story of how Ginger Baker became a pioneer of modern drumming, through his foundations in jazz and rock to his discovery of Afrobeat and African percussion. The screening is followed by a sequence of short performances and talks from London’s most adventurous kit players, full line-up to be announced soon.

Saturday 16: Scala: Pioneers of Percussion, 8pm–3am | £6/£10/£12

At the centre of the festival, Nonclassical takes over legendary club venue Scala to present iconic repertoire including: Edgard Varese’s Ionisation, (the earliest large-scale percussion ensemble work) and John Cage’s Constructions, virtuoso musicians Joji Hirota, Shahbaz Hussain and Abass Dodoo, and a complete performance of Steve Reich’s seminal Drumming. With three rooms of live music and DJs surveying a whole spectrum of percussion-led music throughout the night, this is the unmissable centrepiece of the series.

Sunday 17: Hackney Picturehouse: Filmphonics, 7pm | £7

A film evening inspired by the theme of percussion. African Drum, Beyond the Beat (2012) looks at the various social functions of the drum in West African society, and is followed by a live discussion with director Tariq Richards. Meanwhile Ballet Mécanique (1923) is a rarely-screened Dadaist masterpiece, famous for its extraordinary percussive score by Georges Antheil.

Friday 22: Limewharf: The Theatre of Percussion, 6pm | £5

The closing night of the festival puts the spotlight on music in which performance art and extended technique stretches the boundaries of what percussion can be. With pieces by Kagel, Rzewski, Globokar and others, and performers including Serge Vuille and George Barton.

Other below-the-radar highlights (sorry, all London this month) include:

Tuesday 5: City University: CD launch – History of Photography in Sound, 6.15pm | free, but reserve in advance

The launch of Ian Pace’s landmark recording of Michael Finnissy’s The History of Photography in Sound. Pace will be giving a short introductory lecture on the work at 6.15, with a recital of selected chapters from 7.15.

Wednesday 6: Wigmore Hall, 7.30pm | £30/£25/£20/£15

EXAUDI take to the stage again at the Wigmore Hall, as part of its Contemporary Music Series, this time performing Renaissance madrigals by Carlo Gesualdo alongside works by Finnissy, Schöllhorn, Fox and Gervasoni.

Tuesday 12: City University: Lauren Sarah Hayes and Pamela Z, 7pm | free, but reserve in advance

Works for voice and electronics featuring a performance by Pamela Z, one of the pioneers of live looping techniques.

Tuesday 12: St David’s Room, Kings College, 6.30pm | free, I believe

Launch party for new CD of James Erber’s flute music. Matteo Cesari will play a short recital of works by Erber, Ferneyhough and Pintscher.

Thursday 14: Maida Vale Studios: BBC Symphony Orchestra, new music by British composers, 7pm | free, but reserve in advance

BBC SO studio concert of new work by young British composers, including Tom Coult, Aaron Holloway-Nahum, Benajmin Oliver and Emily Howard, plus UK premiere of Robin Holloway’s In China.

Thursday 14: The Forge, Camden: Octandre Ensemble, 7pm | £7/£9 in advance, £8/£10 on the door

Six newly commissioned works by Maxim Boon, William Cheshire, Patrick John Jones, Sam Messer, Nick Morrish Rarity and Kristoffer To.

In exchange for a ticket, promoters New Dots are looking for three audience members to write 400-word reviews of the concert that can be posted on their blog. If you’re interested see the New Dots website for more details.

Tuesday 19: City University: Madeleine Mitchell and Ian Pace, 7pm | free, but reserve in advance

Violin and piano recital, including music by Berio and Marco Stroppa.

Tuesday 26: Cafe OTO: Kammer Klang, 8pm | £7

The final Kammer Klang night of 2013 sees Plus-Minus appearing alongside Leafcutter John in a set that includes music by Bernhard Lang, Newton Armstrong and Johannes Kreidler.

Secret Music: July

(Click for the background to the Secret Music listings.)

I’ll be honest, I’m not on top of the listings this month; if you have anything coming up in July that you’d like me to consider including please give me a shout.

Already updated with a few additional events.

Tuesday 2 July: The Forge, Camden: Mercury Quartet, 7.30pm | £9/7 online, £10/8 on the door

Music of Romanian origin or association:

Niculescu - Echos II (UK premiere)
Diana Rotaru – new commission
Oliver Weeks – new commission
Julian Anderson - Bearded Lady
Dan Dediu - Concert Gotic (UK premiere)

Wednesday 3 July: Nonclassical: Ligeti Quartet and Rarescale, 8pm | £5 in advance

Double header Nonclassical event at The Macbeth, featuring the Ligeti Quartet, and Carla Rees (flute) and Michael Oliva (electronics). Programme:

Christian Mason – Sai Ma
John Adams – Fellow Traveller
Anna Meredith – Songs for the M8
Arvo Pärt – Fratres
Béla Bartók – Quartet No. 4 (finale)

Lorenz Dangel – Soundtracking
Michael Oliva – Apparition and Release
Elizabeth Brown – Antarctica
Dan Di Maggio – Same Old Monsters (world premiere)
Michael Oliva – Bereft Adrift
Bret Battey – Paternoster’s Tricyclic Companion
Scott Miller – Anterior/Interior
Michael Oliva – A Memory of Spring

Friday 5 July: St Mary at Hill: Music We’d Like To Hear I, 7.30 | £9/£6 concs

Markus Trunk curates. Music by Craig Shepard, Eva-Maria Houben, Kunsu Shim, John White, Mieko Shiomi and Daniel James Wolf. Played by the MWLTH ensemble. See also previous posting.

Saturday 6 July: LSO St Luke’s: LSO Soundhub Showcase, 7.30pm | £7/£5 concs

Composer and jazz pianist Raymond Yiu curates a showcase of works by Soundhub members and associates, as well as a set of variations on Yiu’s own Podskok, including variations written by Patrick Brennan, Martin Butler, Richard Causton, William Cheshire, Jonathan Dove, Cheryl Frances-Hoad, Morgan Hayes, Matthew Kaner, Fung Lam, Colin Matthews, Edward Nesbit, Anjula Semmens and Toby Young. Other pieces on the programme include:

Darren Bloom – Rundown (2008)
Christian Mason Trio – In Space Enlaced (2008/2012) (UK premiere of present version)
Oliver Christophe Leith – Shima (2013) (World premiere)
Edward Nesbit – A Pretence of Wit (2010)

Tuesday 9 July: Sarah Loveys, Samuel Wilson, Julia Samojło: Shades of Britain, 7:00pm | Free

As part of their Transatlantic Affair concert series, the Guildhall School of Music presents a concert of music for soprano, percussion and piano, including pieces by Thomas Adès, Julian Anderson, Oliver Knussen, Raymond Yiu, Julian Philips and Harrison Birtwistle.

PLEASE NOTE: This concert is no longer taking place as scheduled.

Friday 12 July: St Mary at Hill: Music We’d Like To Hear II, 7.30 | £9/£6 concs

John Lely curates. Music by Cassandra Miller, Jürg Frey, Paul Newland, Richard Glover and Tim Parkinson. Performed by Mira Benjamin. See also previous posting.

Friday 19 July: St Mary at Hill: Music We’d Like To Hear III, 7.30 | £9/£6 concs

Tim Parkinson curates. Music by Jürg Frey, Christian Wolff, Jonathan Marmor, Matteo Fargion and Luiz Henrique Yudo. Anton Lukoszevieze and Tim Parkinson perform. See also previous posting.

25–28 July: London Contemporary Music Festival, times vary | Free, but pre-booking needed

Concerts each day: 25th, To a new definition of opera; 26th, Lachenmann/Morricone; 27th Glenn Branca Ensemble; 28th Drone Day.

All concerts take place at Bold Tendencies at Peckham Car Park. See previous post for more details.

26–28 July: Full of Noises festival, Barrow-in-Furness, times vary | £15 festival pass, £12 day pass

Three-day weekend of new music, sound art, talks and gubbins. Featuring: SoundFjord, the Bohman Brothers, Ryoko Akama, Felix Kubin, Dirty Electronics, Lauren Redhead,  Jon Hering and loads more. This kind of stuff doesn’t often happen in West Cumbria, so get out there if you can. There’s a full programme here; prices are ridiculous.

Secret Music: June

(Click for the background to the Secret Music listings.)

Busy one this month as the summer festival season swings into action. Sorry it’s all a bit London-centric.

Saturday 1 June: Schott, 48 Great Marlborough Street, London: Jonathan Powell, 7pm | Price unknown, but usually just a few quid

Solo piano recital, including Aperghis – A tombeau ouvert, Radulescu – 2nd Sonata, Barrett – Lost and Sorabji – Le Jardin parfume.

Saturday 8 June: Bishopsgate Institute, Scanner: The Haxan Cloak, 8pm | £16

Scanner aka Robin Rimbaud, Bobby Krlic aka The Haxan Cloak and the Computer Junk Orchestra reimagine John Dowland’s renaissance piece Lachrimae alongside new music and visuals. Part of the Spitalfields Summer Festival.

Monday 10 June: Hoxton Hall: Rarescale, 8.30pm | £15

Carla Rees leads a digital acoustic ensemble combining flute with live electronics and guitar.  Includes the world premiere of Nicola LeFanu’s A Phoenix for Carla composed in response to Carla’s experience in the London riots. Part of the Spitalfields Summer Festival.

Tuesday 11 June: Rich Mix: REPLICA, 7pm & 8.30pm | £15

Edward Jessen’s visually sumptuous experimental music-theatre work for recorder quintet Consortium5 and vocalists John Potter and Peyee Chen. REPLICA unfurls theatrically-rich layers of cinematic successes in a stunning aural and visual realisation. Part of the Spitalfields Summer Festival.

Wednesday 12 June: The Forge: Mivos Quartet, 7.30pm | £11/£9 online, £12/£10 on the door

Britten’s 100th birthday marked by a performance of his Third Quartet, alongside contemporary works by

Felipe Lara,

Mario Diaz de Leon and Philip Glass

Saturday 15 June: Bishopsgate Institute: Powerplant, 8pm | £16

Joby Burgess presents Powerplant, a partnership with sound designer Matthew Fairclough and filmmaker Kathy Hinde, culminating in a collaboration with Gabriel Prokofiev. Part of the Spitalfields Summer Festival.

Wednesday 19 June: Village Underground: At The World’s Edge, 6.30pm & 8.30pm | £15

Combining puppetry, electronic soundscapes and live music, At The World’s Edge recasts the Greek myth of Persephone’s descent into the underworld. I saw an early incarnation of this as a London Sinfonietta Blue Touch Paper project, and it was shaping up well. Part of the Spitalfields Summer Festival.

Monday 24 June: Performance Space, City University: Mark Knoop and Séverine Ballon, 7pm | Free, but prebooking necessary.

The twice excellent Mark Knoop and Séverine Ballon play Feldman’s Patterns in a Chromatic Field for piano and cello, alongside a new work by Georgia Rodgers for cello and electronics.

Late addition: Wednesday 26 June: Royal Northern College of Music, Carole Nash Hall: ACM Ensemble, 8.30pm | £5 on the door

The Manchester-based ACM Ensemble brings a focus on Swiss new music to this concert, which includes works by Holliger, Furrer, Michael Cutting, Tom Rose and a UK premiere from Oscar Bianchi.

Beat Furrer - Presto
Heinz Holliger - Studie über Mehrklänge
Michael Cutting - Artificial White (ACM Commission)
Tom Rose - Schadenfreude (ACM Commission)
Beat Furrer - Lotofagas I (UK Premiere)
Oscar Bianchi - Crepuscolo (UK Premiere)

Friday 28 June: St Giles Cripplegate, Richard Uttley, 1.05pm | Free

Ending the month with another solo piano recital, this time by Richard Uttley, who will play works by Lindberg, Adès and Berio, alongside the UK premiere of Marvin Wolfthal’s 2008 Lulu Fantasy, a paraphrase on Berg’s opera. Part of the City of London Festival.