Instrumental noise at Nonclassical

A quick note about a forthcoming night at Nonclassical. I’ve got to say, this appeals a lot more than that recent Jonny Greenwood/Penderecki mashup.

April 26th, from 9pm
Penderecki: Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima for 52 solo strings
Xenakis: Peaux from ‘Pleiades’ for 6 percussionists
Ligeti: Lux Aeterna for 16 singers

Alex Smoke [Soma/Vakant] 2 hour DJ set
+ Gabriel Prokofiev / Clean Bandit / Nwando
 

Gabriel Prokofiev’s cult classical club night returns to XOYO in April following the success of its Minimalist night in January.

With a programme exploring extreme instrumental textures from the 1960s alongside contemporary electronica, this event is set to be even
bigger than Nonclassical’s last.

Krysztof Penderecki’s ‘Threnody’ for 52 solo strings (24 violins 10 violas 10 cellos and 8 double basses) is an experiment in sound
composition
 written in 1960. It begins with all instruments playing their highest note as loudly as possible, and uses techniques such as
slapping the instrument’s body.

Gyorgy Ligeti’s seminal ‘Lux Aeterna’ for 16 solo singers, (as featured in Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey).

‘Peaux’ from Iannis Xenakis’ masterpiece ‘Pleaides’ for percussion sextet. Each movement of the piece uses a specific family of
percussion, and Peaux (skins) is written for for drums: 44 in total, including 6 timpani.

Live performances of these works on XOYO’s underground club stage will alternate with DJ sets from Gabriel Prokofiev and Clean Bandit concluding with a 2 hour headline set from lauded DJ and producer Alex Smoke, who is ‘mixing dancefloor influences with a questing passion for innovation’ (clashmusic). Smoke has a background in classical music and recenty worked with the Scottish Ensemble on a new live-performed film soundtrack for Glasgow Film Festival. His specially devised set will trace a continuum from the extreme sound worlds of Xenakis, Ligeti and Penderecki through to contemporary electronic dance music.  

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