Paul Morley goes all Kyle Reese on the future of the orchestra

Come_with_me_if_you_want_to_live

“Come with me if you want to live”: Paul Morley delivers his keynote to the ABO Conference

I owe Paul Morley an apology. Ten years ago (pretty much to the day; weird) I read Words and Music, threw it across the room in annoyance and wrote a few scathing words about it on this blog. Nine years ago (even closer to the day; weirder), I took another swing, muttering something about 6th-form literary gimmicks as I did so.

Well, I was younger then, and in my 20s, so what did I know. But I have, recently, been won over by Morley’s switch of allegiance from pop to classical music.

First there was a review of this year’s Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival that was head and shoulders the most engaged and involving review of the festival that I can recall seeing.

Then there was his turn as part of a panel on the future of the orchestra at the closing weekend of The Rest Is Noise, which, in an awkward double act with Igor Toronyi-Lalic, drew audience gasps and easily made for the liveliest part of the weekend.

And now he has today delivered the keynote speech at the Association of British Orchestras’ annual conference. Here are some choice quotes:

that endless supply of glorious music from the history of music … an extraordinary interlinked sequence of themes, forms and dramas …

It is pop music that is now about its past, about anniversaries and retrospection, and more and more about its revered dead or nearly dead icons, and from where I listen and think, it is classical music, whether from the 18th century or last week, that seems to be more about challenge, mystery, metamorphosis and the essence of what it is to be human.  At a time when what it is to be human is threatened by the emergence and speedy mutation of machines and the provisional emergence of an unfathomable machine consciousness, it seems increasingly important, if just for old time’s sake, that the human isn’t completely lost.

… But the music we look towards for this human presence should not sound as though it has been made to serve machines, and complete their mission to turn reality into a tightly coordinated  sequence of pulses, rhythms, patterns, clichés, climaxes and abbreviations – or, to give them the benefit of the doubt, into an explosive utopian paradise where all our unruly needs our instantly catered for … 

… In the end, the greater point is not reaching a wider audience, because to do so means sacrificing every single thing that you do that means anything, but ensuring that music as something more than entertainment survives by ensuring that it still evolves, by marketing the music played by orchestras not as some sort of spa therapy, or teaching aid, or social welfare, but as something that contributes to our knowledge of music and therefore of what it is to be human, here in space, at this weird moment in time.

… For me, the future of the orchestra, even beyond the problems of funding, or structural replenishment, involves committing itself to the idea that what it is about maybe problematical, difficult, severe, even obscure, but that’s what it is, and it’s ridiculous to pretend otherwise.

I’m still not a fan of those overlong sentences, but I may need to reread Words and Music. Although I will have to buy a new copy, since I Oxfamed the last one. Who’s the winner there, eh?

Read the full text of Paul Morley’s speech here.

3 thoughts on “Paul Morley goes all Kyle Reese on the future of the orchestra

  1. Oh Tim, you absolutely *must* re-read Words and Music; hands down one of the most exhilarating & enlightened books about music I’ve ever read. Give it another crack!

  2. Slightly bemused that you should find Morley so… awkward. I love the way he engages with music. Words and Music is exactly as described by Simon above, no one else writes with the same slightly off piste passion for the subject. Didn’t you want to be in the car with Kylie and John, driving through the city? Beautiful.

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