Michael Finnissy talks about bas & koen & nora, and more

One of the highlights of the London Ear next weekend will be the presence of the Dutch trio 7090 – Bas Wiegers, violin, Koen Kaptijn, trombone and Nora Mulder, piano. As well as music by Xenakis, Helmut Zapf, Toshio Hosokawa and others, their concert on Friday evening features two pieces by Michael Finnissy, Playera 1 and The Croppy Boy. These come from a larger collection Finnissy has written for 7090, under the title bas & koen & nora. (Listen to an excerpt from Playera 1 here.) Many of the pieces are written to give an insight into the personalities and enthusiasms of the three players. So Koen Kaptijn mentioned that he had always wanted to play a Haydn string quartet (something that as a trombonist he had never been able to do), so Finnissy wrote two movements of pastiche Haydn, with the violin, trombone and two hands of the piano making up the quartet. ‘It’s a kind of Kammerspiel when you do the performance, it’s like a kind of play in which you are looking in to the lives of the three people,’ says Finnissy.

Here’s an extended and quite lovely interview with Finnissy, made by 7090, in which he talks about the piece and its ideas, as well as other topics besides. His thoughts on Aldo Clementi’s music (one of the many presences in bas & koen & nora) are worth hearing, and his remarks on complexity towards the end of the video are well worth sticking around for.

P.S. I will be hosting a show on Resonance FM this evening from 8pm on the subject of the London Ear. I will be joined by the festival’s directors Andrea Cavallari and Gwyn Pritchard, as well as flautist Jenni Hogan, who will also be appearing in the festival’s opening concert on Thursday. Tune in to 104.4FM if you’re in London, or listen online if you’re anywhere else in the world.

2 thoughts on “Michael Finnissy talks about bas & koen & nora, and more

  1. Very nice interview, thanks Tim for posting it. The comments on complexity reminded me of being in Heidelberg with Michael almost thirty years ago, looking down over the hundreds of roofs all slightly or occasionally not so slightly different in size, shape and colour, and Michael saying “how could anyone look at that and then write simple music”? Well, I guess quite a few people can… but what I took from that moment was that actually no music is simple (in the same sense as his comment in the interview that no people are simple), but that some music encourages the listener to hear and become immersed in its complexity, sometimes just by hinting obliquely at it, like the seventh part of “English Country-Tunes”.

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