Playlists for the Long Distancing

We’re going to be indoors for a long time now. In case it helps ease the pressure, I’m going to be revisiting my back catalogue of new music playlists and posting things here every weekend. Some of these lists regular readers will have seen before; some of them will be new collections. (Or at least ones I’ve had knocking around privately for a while.)

Love and art are what will get us through, so keep your families close, and use the time to listen to some great music.

To start with, a run-down of playlists made to mark International Women’s Day between 2011 and 2018. I hope that you find some things you like.

2011: Music by Lockwood, Rehnqvist, Weir, Tian, Neuwirth and more

Original post about this list is here.

2012: Music by Chambers, Monk, Lim, Berberian, Bång and more

Original post about this list is here.

2013: Music by Lockwood, Weir, Mamlok, Jugend, Hodkinson and more

Original post about this list is here.

2014: Music by Amacher, Spiegel, Canat de Chizy, Z, Fullman and more

Original post about this list is here.

2015: Music by Payne, Rylan, Mundry, Polli, Westerkamp and more

Original post about this list is here.

2016: No list for this year. (Sorry.)

2017: Music by Oliveros, Z, Ali-Zadeh, Walshe, León and more

Original post about this list is here.

2018: Music by Iannotta, Pritchard, Joyce, Norman, Gísladóttir and more

Original post about this list is here.

One thought on “Playlists for the Long Distancing

  1. Excellent list of compositions by woman composers (if that term isn’t rightly redundant by now).

    There are lots of pieces I might contribute to complement some of the more obvious recommedations offered in the various lists; for example I really, really love Kaija Saariaho’s (electrouacoustic?) Stilleben’ (Still Life) from around 1989 which explores the connotations and metaphors that naturally emerge during a long train journey, taking in various concrete sounds along the way, as well as snippets of Kafka (obviously!) as well as lovely fragments of Saariaho’s own voice.

    I also love Laurie Anderson’s early piece (way before she was famous I think) called ‘Time to Go’ – a wonderfully atmospheric and plangent vocal (and violin) piece that meditates on the nightly closure of an art gallery (MoMA) with Scott Johnson on guitar and organ. What is sadder that a museum or gallery closing at the end of every day?

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